Jobs and Job Searching

Finding a Job is a Full Time Job

1) Approach finding a job as if it were a full-time job, because it is. If you had a job, you would report to work at the same time each day (like 8 am), take an hour (or less) for lunch, and quit at the same time each day (like 5 pm). You would work five days every week. And you would work hard to accomplish as much as you could because your career depended upon it.

When you are searching for a job, you should follow the same type of schedule because your future depends upon it.

Treating your job search like a part-time hobby guarantees that it will take longer.

So, begin tomorrow by reporting to work and spending the day on tasks that lead to a job.

2) Approach finding a job as if it were a project. That means you should set goals for yourself, make plans, and monitor your progress. You should apply all of the tools and skills that you used in your last job to the project of finding your next job.

As you must expect, this is an important project. The sooner you complete it, the sooner you gain a promotion into a job.

3) Be your own boss. Set expectations for what you need to accomplish, provide direction, and monitor your work.

Meet with yourself once each week to evaluate your performance. I recommend doing this by writing two reports. The first is a candid evaluation of what you accomplished during the previous week. The second is a description of your plans for the coming week. Your plans should include your goals, actions, and priorities.

The first time that you write these reports, write an evaluation of what you have done so far. Describe the results that this effort has produced. And compare these results with what you wanted to have.

Next, map out a realistic plan for the next week based on achievable goals. For example, you could set goals for the number of people you will call, the number of networking meetings you will attend, and the research you will conduct.

In the coming weeks, compare the results that you obtained during the previous week with the goals that you set. For example, if you planned to attend twelve networking meetings and you attended only two, you should a) explain why this happened and b) plan actions that will correct such a difference. You should also analyze why you missed your goal because this provides insights on what you need to do differently. For example, Your goal (e.g., of attending twelve networking meetings) may have been set too high. Or maybe there are things you can do that will make it easier to achieve your job search goals, such as car pooling with a friend who is also looking for a job.

Finding a job is a full time job. Work through it with a plan and the support of a good boss (yourself).

I wish you the best of success.

Putting Yourself in Someone Else’s Shoes

Have you ever just sat down to brunch on a quiet morning at home and had the doorbell ring? Have you ever opened your email and found 25 spam mails where someone was trying to sell you something? It makes you wish that the sales people of the world would just leave you to hell alone and let you get on with a nice weekend.

Now put yourself in the shoes of a good dev person who is not really looking for a new job. They have nothing that they really want to change about their life and they aren’t actually looking for a new job.

You are the sales person who is annoying them and trying to get them to notice you. They know quite well that you’re receiving a good commission so the standard mindset is that you’re using them to get a nice payday.

How would that make you feel? Would you be put off and looking for a way to get them out of your view? In most cases, that’s how your dev prospects feel.

Most of us as dev recruiters don’t take the time to put ourselves in the prospect or the candidates shoes. We don’t get why they might feel uncomfortable and why they might be uncomfortable putting their future in the hands of someone they don’t know and are not sure has their best interests at heart.

If you put yourself in the candidates shoes then you’ll take a different approach. You’ll show them somehow that while you are getting a paycheck you do genuinely care about the job you are filling and the person who will fill it. Your prospects do not want to be sold. They want to be considered and cared about and they want you to show them that your prospects or candidates are respected for their skills and their accomplishments.

If you’re looking for great candidates and you want them to really listen to you, it’s way past time to get over the old tired sales techniques and move on to something new and something different… something that actually works.

Get creative and think seriously about what you would want if you were a candidate and then offer that something new and unique to them. You might be surprised how well it works.

Finding a Great Computer Job

Got a difficult problem in your job search?

Say, a lack of networking contacts? Or trouble answering interview questions?

Well, you’ve got company. Problems in a job search are as common as mosquitoes in July.

But … have you ever written your problem down on a piece of paper?

I’ll bet you haven’t.

Because, when you write problems down, you take an immediate, huge leap towards solving them. Think about it: Every great invention or solution, from the atomic bomb to the Xbox, was first worked out on paper.

Why not solve your employment problems the same way?

Here’s a three-step method that will help you do it …

1) Start by asking the right questions
Most folks put themselves behind the eight ball in their job search by asking questions that are depressing and demotivating.

Questions like, Why won’t anyone give me a job? or How do I network when I don’t know anyone?

Ack. Pass the happy pills.

Instead, start asking questions that motivate and inspire you.

Better questions to ask are:

How could I give people a reason to call me with job leads?
Which job recruiter can I use that will help me to find a better job or a better career path.
How did my 10 closest friends find their current jobs?
How could I brainstorm with them and use their methods in my job hunt?
What worked in my last job search? The job search before? How could I do that again?

Important: Ask questions that you yourself can solve. Never depend on the government, your school, parents, family — anyone else — to do this for you. Because, once you give up responsibility for solving problems with your job search (or anything else), you become a prisoner of outside forces.
Find someone that you trust to help you, whether that is a job recruiter or a counselor or someone else.

When you ask the right questions, however, you’re halfway to the answer. So write down at least five empowering questions about your job search, right now.

Then, you’re ready for step two …

2) Brainstorm at least 20 possible answers
After you write down five good questions, circle the one question that looks most promising. You’re going to use it to get hired faster.

Let’s say you write the following question down atop a clean sheet of paper:

How could I give people a reason to call me with job leads?

Write a number 1 below it. Write a possible answer next to that number. Then move on to number 2, 3 . and don’t stop until you have at least 20 answers to your question.

Not 15 or 19, but 20 answers — or more.

There’s a reason for this: Left to its own devices, your brain will pull a Homer Simpson after two minutes and try to talk you into going out for donuts or beer. Brains hate to think. Like bench pressing, thinking is strenuous work, no matter how good it may be for you.

But don’t let your head off the hook. Don’t stop until you get 20 possible solutions. Brainstorm as if your career depended on the outcome. Because it does.

Now. Most of your 20 answers won’t be very good — that’s OK. Your best answer may come right after the most hare-brained. By forcing yourself to write out 20 answers, you’re flushing the creative pipes while going deep into your subconscious mind to dredge up a winner.

Don’t knock it until you try it!

3) Take action on one solution today
Choose the most promising from your list of 20 answers. Then, get started — today — to make it happen. No excuses.

Let’s say the most actionable of your solutions is to throw a networking party where you can meet friends, family and acquaintances, and let them know about your job search.

Now. What do you need to do to make this party happen?

Well, you have to make the guest list, send invitations, get the food, etc. So write down all the sub-goals necessary for the party to be a success. Check each sub-goal off your list as you complete it. Before you know it, your networking party will be a reality.

After that, take the next most-promising solution from your list of 20 and make that one happen. Repeat until hired.

Here’s why these 3 steps work when it comes to solving problems — clear thinking plus continuous action equals results.

If you’re struggling to find a job, write down clear, empowering questions of your situation. Then, brainstorm at least 20 possible solutions and take action on the best one today. When you do, you’ll be that much closer to getting the job you really want, faster.

If you’re loooking for other tips on finding the best computer jobs, contact the helpful folks at